All Indicators of the 2nd wave of the euHS_i survey (N=95)

 
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ID Indicator name Source Explanatory Information

Access to Care

1 Share of population covered by health insurance A,B,D,E Percentage of population covered by i) Government/ social health insurance, ii) private health insurance.
2 Self-reported unmet need for medical care (total by reason: cost, waiting time, distance) A,B,D,E Disaggregated by sex, by age group (total, 18-64, 65+), by education level (ISCED 0-1, 2, 3-4, 5-6) and by income quintile. Proportion of persons with self-declared unmet needs for medical care services due to either financial barriers, waiting times or traveling distances.
4 Self-reported unmet need for dental care (total by reason: cost, waiting time, distance) A,B,E Disaggregated by sex, by age group (total, 18-64, 65+), by education level (ISCED 0-1, 2, 3-4, 5-6) and by income quintile. Proportion of persons with self-declared unmet needs for dental care services due to either financial barriers, waiting times or traveling distances.
5 Out-of-pocket medical spending as a share of final household consumption A,B,D,E Out-of-pocket payments are expenditures borne directly by a patient where neither public nor private insurance cover the full cost of the health good or service. They include cost-sharing and other expenditure paid directly by private households and should also include estimations of informal payments to health care providers. Only expenditure for medical spending (i.e. current health spending less expenditure for the health part of long-term care) is presented here, because the capacity of countries to estimate private long-term care expenditure varies widely. Household final consumption expenditure covers all purchases made by resident households to meet their everyday needs such as food, clothing, rent or health services.
6 Percentage of households experiencing high levels/catastrophic of out-of-pocket health expenditures D,E Percentage of households experiencing high levels of/ catastrophic out-of-pocket health expenditures using different thresholds by age and income quintiles.
8 Private household out-of-pocket expenditure as a proportion of total health expenditure C,E Out of pocket expenditure is any direct outlay by households, including gratuities and in-kind payments, to health practitioners and suppliers of pharmaceutical, therapeutic appliances and other goods and service whose primary intent is to contribute to the restoration or enhancement of the health status of individuals or population groups. It is a part of private expenditure’.
9 Out-of-pocket payments as percentage of GDP, per capita E Out of pocket expenditure is any direct outlay by households, including gratuities and in-kind payments, to health practitioners and suppliers of pharmaceutical, therapeutic appliances and other goods and service whose primary intent is to contribute to the restoration or enhancement of the health status of individuals or population groups. It is a part of private expenditure’, expressed in following units: i) as percentage of GDP, ii) in PPS per capita.
12 Geographic distribution of doctors: Physicians density in predominantly urban and rural regions B Density per 1 000 population
13 Accessibility to acute care E Percentage of people who can REACH primary, emergency and materinity care services within 15/30 minutes
20 Reported waiting times for access to specialist (care) A,D,E No attempt was made to provide a single definition; instead following definitions are considered as examples: Waiting time of more than two weeks to get an appointment with a specialist (% of population asking an appointment). Waited 2 months or longer for specialist appointment (base: needed to see specialist in past 2 years) (by two income categories). Waiting time longer than 1 month for first contact in ambulatory mental health centre (% of pop with contact in ambulatory mental health centre). Waiting time, referral to treatment: Doctors report patients often experience long wait times to receive treatment after diagnosis (e.g. cancer treatment delays). Percentage of patients treated within 18 weeks
22 Waiting times for elective surgeries A,B,D,E Average inpatient waiting time for elective (i.e. non-urgent) surgeries of Percutanerous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA), hip replacement and cataract operation, measured in number of days. Elective surgery is defined as when surgery is necessary, but the timing of the procedure can be scheduled and the patient can be sent home.
23 Rate of patients with colorectal tumour receiving chemotherapy whose treatment started within two months following surgery E This indicator aims to detect effects of the policy changes on timely delivery of services to colorectal cancer patients.
25 Numbers of people awaiting donor organs E The numbers refer to people actively awaiting a transplant, who have been approved by a transplantation centre and who are ready to receive the transplant.
26 Waiting times for admission to public rehabilitation facility and to public long-term care facility E Waiting times for admission to public rehabilitation facility ‘The denominator is the total number of patients referred for rehabilitation in a year under review who are accepted for a period of rehabilitation at RHKG. The numerator is the total number of patients actually transferred for rehabilitation at RHKG during the year under review. The median waiting time is from date of referral to date of transfer. Exclusion criteria: deceased patients while waiting and discharged patients while waiting.’ Waiting times for admission to public long-term care facility ‘The denominator is the total number of patients applying for government long term care during the year under review. The numerator is the total number of patients admitted to government long term care within 18 months from the date of application. The median waiting time is from date of application of long term care to date of admission. Exclusion criteria: deceased patients while waiting and patients withdrawing their application’.
27 Waiting times for home/social care services E Percentages of clients receiving home help services within one month of approval

Health Care Resources: Labour

31 Employment in human health and social work activities A,D Disaggregated by age, by educational attainment level, by NUTS regions. Employment in health and social work, NACE rev 2 Q. Number of employees between age 15 and 64.
32 Practising physicians A,B,C,D,E Practising physicians per 100,000 population by category (MD, dentists, pharmacists, physiotherapists, psychiatrists) and partly by age and sex Physicians by specialty per 100 000 population (GP, general paediatricians, obstetricians and gynaecologists, psychiatrists, medical group of specialists, surgical group of specialists).
33 Share of GPs in all physicians A,B,E Share of generalist medical practitioners in all physicians.
38 Practising qualified nurses and midwives A,B,C,E Practising qualified nurses and midwives, per 100,000 population

Health Care Resources: Capital

46 Hospital beds A,B,D,E The total number of hospital beds per 100,000 inhabitants. (total number, acute care, psychiatric care, long-term care)

Health Care Activities

52 Hospital utilization A,B,C,D,E Total, disaggregated by selected diagnoses. Hospital in-patient discharges / age-standardized rate of hospitalization / Volume of admissions, selected diagnoses: The number of hospital in-patient discharges from all hospitals during a given calendar year, expressed per 100,000 population, age-standardized by age group (0-64, 65+), by sex for selected diagnoses (ISHMT code 0000 = ICD-10 codes A00-Z99 excluding V,W,X & Y codes and healthy newborns Z38). Calculated and presented by the following 25 categories of the International Shortlist for Hospital Morbidity Tabulation (ISHMT). (Total (All Causes), Infectious and Parasitic Diseases, Neoplasms, Malignant Neoplasm of Colon, Rectum & Anus; Trachea / Bronchus / Lung; Breast; Uterus; Prostate; Diabetes Mellitus, Mental & Behavioural Disorders, Dementia, Mental and Behavioural Disorders due to Alcohol, Mood [Affective] Disorders, Diseases of the Nervous System/Circulatory/Respiratory System; AMI, Cerebrovascular Disease, COPD and Bronchiectasis, Asthma, Diseases of the Digestive System, Alcoholic Liver Disease, Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System & Connective Tissue, Diseases of the Genitourinary System, Injury, Poisoning & Certain Other Consequences of External Causes)
54 Hospital day-cases, total and selected diagnoses A,E Hospital day cases total and for selected diagnoses (ISHMT code 0000 = ICD-10 codes A00-Z99 excluding V,W,X & Y codes and healthy newborns Z38), per 100,000 inhabitants: total population, by age group (0-64, 65+), by sex
55 Average length of stay (ALOS), total and selected diagnoses A,B,C,D,E Total population age-standardized, for selected diagnoses; by type of care (acute, mental and rehabilitation hospitals) disaggregated by age group (0-64, 65+), by sex. In-patient average length of stay (in days) , for selected diagnose (ISHMT code 0000 = ICD-10 codes A00-Z99 excluding V,W,X & Y codes and healthy newborns Z38, e.g. cancers, AMI, normal delivery, ). Average length of stay (ALOS) is computed by dividing the total number of in-patient hospital days , in all hospitals, counted from the date of admission to the date of discharge by the total number of discharges (including deaths) in all hospitals during a given year. A hospital day (or bed-day or in-patient day) is a day, during which a person admitted as an in-patient, is confined to a bed and stays overnight in a hospital. Day-cases (patients formally admitted for a medical procedure or surgery in the morning and discharged before the evening) are excluded. Patients admitted with the intention of discharge on the same day, but who subsequently stay in hospital overnight, are included.
59 General practitioner (GP) utilisation: self-reported visits / Number of doctor consultations A,B,E Disaggregated by age group (15+, 15-64, 65+), by sex, by educational level (ISCED class 0-2, 3-4, 5-6) and income level. Mean number of self-reported visits to general practitioner age-standardized per person per year. Derived from EHIS questions HC10 and HC11. HC10: When was the last time you consulted a GP (general practitioner) or family doctor on your own behalf? (1) Less than 12 months ago /2) 12 months ago or longer / 3) Never)
68 Number of surgical operations and procedures A,B,D,E The number of surgical operations and procedures performed in hospitals, inpatient surgery, age-standardized per 100,000 population, by sex, For following categories: PTCA (Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty); Hip Replacement, Cataract, Tonsillectomy, Coronary Artery Bypass Graft, Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy, Repair of Inguinal Hernia, Caesarean Section, Total Knee Replacement, Partial Excision of Mammary Gland, Total Mastectomy, non-conservative breast surgery, Hysterectomy in uterine cancer, Hysterectomy without uterus cancer diagnosis, Adenoidectomy and/or tonsillectomy, Prostatectomy with prostate cancer/benign prostatic hyperplasia, Kidney transplants
69 Caesarean section rates A,B,D,E Disaggregated by age and regional level. The caesarean section rate is the number of caesarean deliveries (emergency, elected, nulliparous term singleton vertex (NTSV) or low-risk group, high risk) performed per 100 live births.
71 Abortion rates D,E Percentage of induced abortions (prior to nine completed weeks of pregnancy) per 1000 live births, per 1000 women and by age group.

Health Expenditure and Financing

75 Total health care expenditure by all financing agents (total, public and private sectors) A,B,C,D,E Total health expenditure for total, public, and private sectors expressed in following units: i) in Purchasing Power Standard (PPS) per capita, ii) as percentage of gross domestic product (GDP), iii) in millions of Purchasing Power Standard (PPS). ‘Total expenditure on health measures the final consumption of health goods and services (i.e. current health expenditure, CHE) plus capital investment in health care infrastructure. This includes spending by both public and private sources on medical services and goods, public health and prevention programmes and administration. To compare spending levels between countries, per capita health expenditures are converted to a common currency (US dollar) and adjusted to take account of the different purchasing power of the national currencies, in order to compare spending levels’.
76 Current health care expenditure (CHE) by all financing agents (total, public and private sectors) A,B,E Current health expenditure (CHE) for total, public, and private sectors, expressed in following units: i) in Purchasing Power Standard (PPS) per capita, ii) as percentage of gross domestic product (GDP), iii) in millions of Purchasing Power Standard (PPS). Current health expenditure measures the final consumption of health goods and services without capital investment in health care infrastructure. This includes spending by both public and private sources on medical services and goods, public health and prevention programmes and administration. To compare spending levels between countries, per capita health expenditures are converted to a common currency (US dollar) and adjusted to take account of the different purchasing power of the national currencies, in order to compare spending levels’.
77 Public (current) health expenditure as share of total government expenditure A,B,C,E Public (current) health expenditure (general government health expenditure) as a percentage of total government expenditure (according to COFOG http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Government_expenditure_on_health). The size of the public budget allocated to health.
78 Public current health expenditure as share of total current health expenditure A,B,D,E General government and social security funds (HF.1) current expenditure (HC.1 - HC.9), including long-term nursing care (HC.3), but excluding social services of long-term care (HC.R.6.1) and capital investment in health (HC.R.1); where total is defined as public and private expenditure on health, where private comprises of the categories: private sector (HF.2), rest of the world (HF.3) and not elsewhere classified (HF.0).
79 Gross fixed capital formation in the healthcare sector as a share of GDP B Gross fixed capital formation in the health care system is measured by the total value of the fixed assets that health providers have acquired during the accounting period (less the value of the disposals of assets) and that are used repeatedly or continuously for more than one year in the production of health services. The breakdown by assets includes infrastructure (e.g. hospitals, clinics, etc.), machinery and equipment (including diagnostic and surgical machinery, ambulances, and ICT equipment), as well as soft- ware and databases.
81 Health expenditure per capita in PPP (purchasing power parities) in relation to life expectancy at birth E Total health care expenditure by all financing agents (total, public and private sectors) per capita in PPP defined as the final consumption of health goods and services (i.e. current health expenditure, CHE) plus capital investment in health care infrastructure. This includes spending by both public and private sources on medical services and goods, public health and prevention programmes and administration IN RELATION to Life expectancy at birth defined the average number of years of life remaining if a group of persons at that age were to experience the mortality rates for a particular year over the course of their remaining life.
82 Health expenditure per capita in PPP (purchasing power parities) in relation to avoidable mortality E Total health care expenditure by all financing agents (total, public and private sectors) per capita in PPP defined as the final consumption of health goods and services (i.e. current health expenditure, CHE) plus capital investment in health care infrastructure. This includes spending by both public and private sources on medical services and goods, public health and prevention programmes and administration IN RELATION to Avoidable mortality: A death is considered avoidable if, in the light of medical knowledge and technology or in the light of understanding of the determinants of health at the time of death, all or most deaths from that cause (subject to age limits if appropriate) could be avoided through good quality healthcare (amenable mortality) or by public health interventions in the broadest sense (preventable mortality). More precisely: A death is amenable if, in the light of medical knowledge and technology at the time of death, all or most deaths from that cause could be avoided through good quality health care. A death is preventable if, in the light of understanding of the determinants of health at the time of death, all or most deaths from that cause could be avoided by public health interventions in the broadest sense.
91 Public expenditure for hospitals A,E General government and social security funds (HF.1) expenditure on hospitals (HP.1), including general hospitals (HP.11), mental health and substance abuse hospitals (HP.12) and other specialty hospitals (HP.13) measured according to following units: as % of GDP, as % of public Current Health Expenditure, in PPS per capita.

Quality of Care: Effectiveness - Primary/secondary prevention

98 Vaccination coverage in children A,B,C,D,E Disaggregated by age. Percentage of infants who have been fully vaccinated against important infectious childhood diseases according to national vaccination schemes.
101 Screening rates for selected cancers (breast, cervical, colon) A,B,D,E Proportion of women (aged 50-69) by educational level (ISCED class 0-2, 3-4, 5-6) reporting to have undergone a breast cancer screening test within the past two years. Proportion of women (aged 20-69) by educational level (ISCED class 0-2, 3-4, 5-6) reporting to have undergone a cervical cancer screening test within the past three years. Proportion of persons by sex (aged 50-74) and by educational level (ISCED class 0-2, 3-4, 5-6) reporting to have undergone a colorectal cancer screening test in the past 2 years.

Quality of Care: Effectiveness - Getting better

111 Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratio (HSMR) D,E This indicator examines the ratio of the actual number of in-hospital deaths in a region or hospital to the number that would have been expected based on the types of patients a region or hospital treats. The HSMR is calculated by dividing the actual number of in-hospital deaths by the expected number of in-hospital deaths, for conditions accounting for about 80% of inpatient mortality.
112 30-day in-hospital mortality A,B,D,E Percentage of people who die within 30 days following: i) admission to hospital for a specific acute condition (eg. MI, stroke, hip fracture, major surgery), ii) after arrival to an intensive care unit.

Quality of Care: Effectiveness - Living with illness or disability/chronic care

122 Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSC) Hospitalization Rate A,B,D,E Disaggregated by sex, age, condition. Avoidable hospitalization rate / Emergency admissions to hospital (indirectly standardised rate per 100,000 population) of persons with an ambulator care sensitive condition (ACSC). ACSCs are conditions for which effective management and treatment should prevent admission to hospital. They can be classified as: chronic conditions (e.g. asthma, COPD, Congestive heart failure, diabetes, etc.), where effective care can prevent flare-ups; acute conditions (ear/nose/throat infections, kidney/urinary tract infections, heart failure, among others), where early intervention can prevent more serious progression; and preventable conditions, where immunisation and other interventions can prevent illness (Ham et al 2010). Source: http://www.kingsfund.org.uk/sites/files/kf/field/field_publication_file/data-briefing-emergency-hospital-admissions-for-ambulatory-care-sensitive-conditions-apr-2012.pdf
132 Health-related quality of life for people with long-term conditions E The directly standardised average (mean) EQ-5D™ score for people self-reporting one or more long-term conditions. This indicator measures health-related quality of life for people who identify themselves as having one or more long-standing health conditions. Health-related quality of life refers to the extent to which people: i) have problems walking about; ii) have problems performing self-care activities (washing or dressing themselves); iii) have problems performing their usual activities (work, study etc.); iv) have pain or discomfort;

Quality of Care: Effectiveness - Safety

180 Prevalence and incidence rate of hospital-acquired infections (% of patients hospitalised) D,E Incidence of hospital-acquired MRSA infections (/1000 hospital stays). Incidence of healthcare associated infection (HSAI) – C. difficile. An infection is considered an HAI if all elements of a CDC/NHSN (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Healthcare Safety Networks) site-specific infection criterion were first present together on or after the 3rd hospital day (day of hospital admission is day 1). For an HAI, an element of the infection criterion may be present during the first 2 hospital days as long as it is also present on or after day 3. All elements used to meet the infection criterion must occur within a timeframe that does not exceed a gap of 1 calendar day between elements’

Quality of Care: Patient-centeredness/Responsiveness

197 Satisfaction with healthcare services (% good or very good) A,D,E Measuring the opinion of the population regarding their personal experience when using health services (hospital care, GP, outpatient care, maternity, mental health care, etc.)

Ageing and Long-term Care

227 Old age dependency ratio A,E Population 65 and over to population 15 to 64 years.
229 Proportion of population receiving long-term care A,B,D,E Percentage of total population; by sex, by disease group (dementia, congestive heart failure), by age (younger than 65 years, oder than 85 years), by different types of LTC
230 Share of long-term care recipients aged 65 years and over receiving care at home B Percentage of total LTC recipients aged 65 years and over by clinical and functional condition

Health Status: Mortality

243 Crude death rate per 1000 population C The crude death rate is the number of deaths occurring among the population of a given geographical area during a given year, per 1,000 mid-year total population of the given geographical area during the same year.
244 Life expectancy A,B,C,D,E Total population, disaggregated by sex and by educational attainment. Life expectancy at birth, ages 1, 15, 45 and 65 years represents the average number of years of life remaining if a group of persons at that age were to experience the mortality rates for a particular year over the course of their remaining life.
245 Gap in life expectancy at age 30 by sex and educational level B The gap in the expected years of life remaining at age 30 between adults with the highest level (“tertiary education”) and the lowest level (“below upper secondary education”) of education.
246 Healthy Life Years (HLY) A,B,C,D,E Total population, at birth and at age 65 disaggregated by sex.The indicator of healthy life years (HLY) measures the number of remaining years that a person of specific age is expected to live without any severe or moderate health problems. The notion of health problem for Eurostat's HLY is reflecting a disability dimension and is based on a self-perceived question which aims to measure the extent of any limitations, for at least six months, because of a health problem that may have affected respondents as regards activities they usually do (the so-called GALI - Global Activity Limitation Instrument foreseen in the annual EU-SILC survey). The indicator is therefor also called disability-free life expectancy (DFLE). So, HLY is a composite indicator that combines mortality data with health status data.
247 Potential years of life lost (PYLL) A,B,C,D,E Total population, disaggregated by sex, age, socio-economic-status (SES), cause. Current OECD definition: Potential Years of Life Lost (PYLL) is a summary measure of age-standardized premature mortality rate which provides an explicit way of weighting deaths occurring at younger ages, which are, a priori, preventable. The calculation of PYLL involves summing up deaths occurring at each age multiplying this with the number of remaining years to live up to a selected age limit (70 years for OECD Health data calculation).
248 Disability-Adjusted Life Year (DALY) E Disaggregated by sex and by cause. One DALY can be thought of as one lost year of "healthy" life. The sum of these DALYs across the population, or the burden of disease, can be thought of as a measurement of the gap between current health status and an ideal health situation where the entire population lives to an advanced age, free of disease and disability. (http://www.who.int/healthinfo/global_burden_disease/metrics_daly/en/)
250 Infant mortality rate A,B,C,D,E The ratio of number of deaths of children under one year of age to the number of live births. The value is expressed per 1000 live births.
251 Perinatal mortality rate A,B,E The number of fetal deaths and deaths in the early neonatal period (up to 6 completed days after birth) after live birth, expressed per 1000 live and stillbirths in the same year.Eurostat: Perinatal mortality rate per 1000 births is calculated as the the number of stillbirths plus deaths at age day 0 to (and including) day 6 divided by the number of births. The value is expressed per 1000 births.-) Early neonatal mortality rate per 1000 live births is calculated as the ratio of the number of deaths at age day 0 to (and including) day 6 to the number of live births. The value is expressed per 1000 live births.-) Late foetal mortality rate per 1000 births is calculated as the ratio of the number of stillbirths to 1000 births. The value is expressed per 1000 births.
252 Neonatal mortality rate A,E The number of neonatal deaths (day 0 through 27) after live birth in a given year per 1000 live births in the same year calculated by gestational age, birth weight and plurality. This rate is presented for all births at or after 22 completed weeks of gestation. This rate is sub-divided by timing of death into early neonatal deaths (0-6 days of life) and late neonatal deaths (7-27 days).
253 Postneonatal mortality rate A,E The number of babies and children dying after 29 days to one year old for every 1,000 that were born alive.
362 Fetal mortality rate by gestational age, birth weight, plurality A The number of fetal deaths at or after 22 completed weeks of gestation in a given year per 1000 live and stillbirths in the same year calculated by gestational age, birth weight and plurality. Fetal deaths are differentiated by whether they are spontaneous fetal deaths or result from a termination of pregnancy. Cohort rates (deaths after live birth in the year, even if the deaths occur in the following year) are also collected by the Euro-Peristat project.
254 Child mortality rate A,D,E Death rate per 100,000 population by age 1-14
255 Maternal mortality rate A,C,D,E The maternal mortality ratio is the annual number of female deaths from any cause related to or aggravated by pregnancy or its management (excluding accidental or incidental causes), during pregnancy and childbirth or within 42 days of termination of pregnancy, irrespective of the duration and site of the pregnancy, per 100 000 live births, for a specified year.
256 Avoidable mortality rate: amenable and preventable deaths D,E Avoidable mortality: A death is considered avoidable if, in the light of medical knowledge and technology or in the light of understanding of the determinants of health at the time of death, all or most deaths from that cause (subject to age limits if appropriate) could be avoided through good quality healthcare (amenable mortality) or by public health interventions in the broadest sense (preventable mortality). More precisely: A death is amenable if, in the light of medical knowledge and technology at the time of death, all or most deaths from that cause could be avoided through good quality health care. A death is preventable if, in the light of understanding of the determinants of health at the time of death, all or most deaths from that cause could be avoided by public health interventions in the broadest sense.
257 Preventable mortality rate A,D,E Total number of deaths which can be attributed to preventable deaths (list of ICD codes defined by Eurostat's TS Satellite list). A death is preventable if, in the light of understanding of the determinants of health at the time of death, all or most deaths from that cause could be avoided by public health interventions in the broadest sense.
258 Amenable mortality rate A,B,D,E Total number of deaths which can be attributed to amenable deaths (list of ICD codes defined by Eurostat's TS Satellite list). A death is amenable if, in the light of medical knowledge and technology at the time of death, all or most deaths from that cause could be avoided through good quality health care.
259 Standardized mortality rate from all causes, disaggregated A,B,C,D,E Standardised death rate caused by specific diseases or disease groups per 100,000 inhabitants for the following ICD-10 codes: Total (All Causes), Infectious & Parasitic Diseases, AIDS (HIV Disease), Malignant Neoplasms, Malignant Neoplasm of Stomach, Malignant Neoplasm of Colon, Malignant Neoplasm of Larynx & Trachea / Bronchus / Lung, Malignant Melanoma of Skin, Malignant Neoplasm of Breast, Malignant Neoplasm of Cervix, Malignant Neoplasm of Prostate, Malignant Neoplasm of Lymphatic / Haematopietic Tissue, All Childhood Cancers (Age 0-14 Years), Mental and Behavioural Disorders, Diseases of the Circulatory System, Ischaemic Heart Disease, Cerebrovascular Disease, Diseases of the Respiratory System, Chronic Lower Respiratory Diseases, Diseases of the Digestive System, External Causes of Injury & Poisoning, Accidents, Transport Accidents, Accidental Falls, Suicide & Intentional Self Harm, Homicide / Assault.

Health Status: Morbidity & Well-being

267 Incidence rate of sexually transmitted infections and blood-borne viruses A,C,D,E Disaggregated by sex and age group (0-24, 25-64, 65+). The number of new cases per 100,000 population of syphilis, HIV, AIDS, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, chlamydia and gonococcal infections.
268 Incidence rate of tuberculosis (TB) C,E Disaggregated by sex and age. The number of new cases per 100,000 population of tuberculosis.
269 Incidence rate of measles E Disaggregated by sex and age. The number of new cases per 100,000 population of measles.
271 Birth weight distribution by vital status, gestational age, plurality A,B,D,E Number of births within each 500g weight interval expressed as a proportion of all live and stillbirths calculated by gestational age and vital status at birth for singletons and multiples. Percentage of life births with weighing less than 2500 grams per 100 live births in a given year.
272 Self-reported/perceived general health A,B,D,E Disaggregated by by sex, age-group (15-64, 65+), educational level (ISCED 0-1, 2, 3-4, 5-6), by income quintile (gap q1/q5). Proportion of persons who assess their health to be very good or good.
275 Long-term activity limitations A,B,D Disaggregated by sex, by age-group (15-64, 65+), by educational level (ISCED class 0-1, 2, 3-4, 5-6).Proportion of people reporting that they have long- term restrictions in daily activities.
280 Standardised incidence rates of cancer (breast, colorectal, prostate, lung, cervical) A,B,C,D,E Total population, disaggregated by sex, age group (0-64, 65+) and SES. Total cancer incidence and incidence of the most important cancers, per 100,000 population, in a given year’.
281 Prevalence rate of Diabetes A,D,E Disaggregated by sex, by age-group (15+, 15-64, 65+) and by education level (ISCED class 0-2, 3-4, 5-6).Proportion of individuals reporting to have ever been diagnosed with diabetes and to have been affected by this condition during the past 12 months.Number of individuals that have ever been diagnosed with diabetes and that have been affected by this condition during the past 12 months, per 100,000 / % of population.
282 Incidence rate of Diabetes A,E Percentage of persons with diabetes diagnosed in the past 12 months.
283 Attack rate of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (non-fatal and fatal) and coronary death A,D,E Disaggregated by sex and by age-group (35-74, 35-64).Attack rate of acute myocardial infarction (non-fatal and fatal) and coronary death per 100,000 population.
284 Attack rate of stroke (non-fatal and fatal) A Disaggregated by sex and by age-group (35-84, 35-64). Attack rate of stroke (non-fatal and fatal) per 100,000 population.
287 Prevalence rate of COPD A,D Disaggregated by sex, age-group (15+, 15-64, 65+) and educational level (ISCED class 0-2, 3-4, 5-6).Proportion of individuals reporting to have ever been diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to have been affected by this condition during the past 12 months. Number of individuals that have ever been diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and that have been affected by this condition during the past 12 months, per 100,000 / % of population.
288 Incidence rate of end-stage kidney disease D Number of new cases of treated end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) plus number of individuals who died with an underlying cause of death of renal failure or an associated cause of death of chronic renal failure, end-stage, and did not receive dialysis or transplant treatment (untreated cases), per 100,000 population.
290 Incidence rate of road traffic accidents resulting in injuries A Disaggregated by sex, age-group (15+, 15-24, 25-64, 65+) and educational level (ISCED class 0-2, 3-4, 5-6). Proportion of individuals reporting to have had a road traffic accident during the past 12 months, which resulted in a) injury
292 Incidence rate of occupational diseases E Incidence rates (new cases) of work-related/occupational diseases. WHO definition: An “occupational disease” is any disease contracted primarily as a result of an exposure to risk factors arising from work activity. “Work-related diseases” have multiple causes, where factors in the work environment may play a role, together with other risk factors, in the development of such diseases. (http://www.who.int/occupational_health/activities/occupational_work_diseases/en/)

Determinants of Health: Health behaviour / life course

299 Prevalence of different smoking status, self-reported A,B,C,D,E Diaggregated by sex, age-group (15+, 15-26, 25-64, 65+), educational level (ISCED class 0-2, 3-4, 5-6) and by income quintile gap q1/q5.Proportion of people reporting to i) smoke cigarettes daily, ii) be ex-smokers, iii) have never smoked.
300 Prevalence of smoking among pregnant women A,D,E The number of women who smoke during the third trimester of pregnancy expressed as a proportion of all women delivering live or stillborn babies. When data are not available for the third trimester of pregnancy, data are requested for another time point during pregnancy.
305 Body Mass Index A,B,C,D,E Disaggregated by age-group, by sex and by educational level (ISCED class 0-2, 3-4, 5-6), by income quintile gap q1/q5. Proportion of persons who are underweight, normal weight, obese, i.e. whose body mass index (BMI) is <20 kg/m2 for underweight, <25 kg/m2 for normal weight, ≥25 kg/m2 for overweight and ≥30 kg/m2 for obesity.

Determinants of Health: Environment

330 Opportunities for education: Participation in early childhood education A,E Enrolment rate in ISCED 0-1 for 4 years old pupils
343 Overall experience of life: Life satisfaction A,C Disaggregated by sex, age, income quintile. Subjective well-being encompasses three distinct but complementary sub-dimensions: life satisfaction, based on an overall cognitive assessment; affects, or the presence of positive feelings and absence of negative feelings; and eudaimonics, the feeling that one’s life has a meaning. Life satisfaction represents how a person evaluates or appraises his or her life taken as a whole. It is intended to cover a broad, reflective appraisal the person makes of his or her life. The term «life» is intended here as all areas of a person’s existence. The variable therefore refers to the respondent’s opinion/feeling about the degree of satisfaction with his/her life. It focuses on how people are feeling "these days" rather than specifying a longer or shorter time period. The intent is not to obtain the current emotional state of the respondent but to receive a reflective judgement on their level of satisfaction. Satisfaction with particular life domains (financial situation, housing, job, commuting time, living environment, green and recreational areas, time use and personal relationships) also represent a broad subjective assessment of the respetive area taking into account individual situations and preferences. "Meaning of life" represents the eudaimonic aspect of well-being, whether or not the inviduals deem their life as being worthwhile. It is not related to any specific area of life, focuses rather on life in general. The frequency of positive emotions (happiness) in the last four weeks represents the affects dimension of well-being. Trust in others and in institutions (legal system, political system and the police) is of a general nature and it should not apply to a specific group of people or institution. The legal and political system encompass all institutions in the respective categories, whether local, national or transnational. The availability of social support refers to the one's possibility to ask for help (any kind of help: moral, material or financial) from any relatives, friends or neighbours, whether thethe person needs it or not. Only relatives and friends (or neighbours) who don't live in the same household are considered.

Additional Information on demographic and economic context

345 Total population A,C,D Population on 1 January , total (absolute numbers) by sex, age group, by area (rural, urban), share of immigrant population
346 Birth rate, crude A Live births per 1000 population
363 Distribution of gestational age by vital status, plurality A Number of live births and fetal deaths at each completed week of gestation (starting from 22 weeks) expressed as a proportion of all live and stillbirths for singletons and multiples. Gestational age is defined as the best obstetrical estimate. This distribution is presented, as follows: 22-36 weeks of gestation (preterm births) 37-41 weeks (term births) 41+ weeks (post-term births) Preterm births can also be presented as: 22-27 weeks (extremely preterm) 28-31 weeks (very preterm) 32-36 weeks (moderately preterm)
364 Multiple birth rate by number of fetuses A The number of women in a multiple gestation pregnancy at delivery as a proportion of all women delivering live or stillborn babies by number of fetuses
365 Distribution of parity A Distribution of parity (number of previous live or stillbirths) of women delivering a live or stillbirth.
347 Total fertility rate A,C The mean number of children that would be born alive to a woman during her lifetime if she were to pass through her childbearing years conforming to the fertility rates by age of a given year.
349 GDP per capita A,B,C GDP per capita in PPS per inhabitant.
351 Unemployment rate A,C,D,E Unemployment rate, % of labour force, annual average, total population (15-74 years), by sex
353 Mean and median income A Disaggregated by age and sex. Disposable net income is the total gross disposable income (i.e. all income from work, private income from investment and property, transfers between households and all social transfers received in cash including old-age pensions) minus social security contributions and income taxes payable by employees (see the metadata here).
354 At risk of poverty or social exclusion rate A,D,E The sum of persons who are: a) at-risk-of- poverty (cut-off point: 60% of mean equivalised income) or b) severely materially deprived (population living in households lacking at least 4 items out of the following 9 items: i) to pay rent or utility bills, ii) keep home adequately warm, iii) face unexpected expenses, iv) eat meat, fish or a protein equivalent every second day, v) a week holiday away from home, or could not afford (even if wanted to) vi) a car, vii) a washing machine, viii) a colour TV, or ix) a telephone) or c) living in households with very low work intensity (work less than 20% of their total work potential) as a share of the total population.
355 GINI coefficient (income distribution) A,C,E Gini index measures the extent to which the distribution of income (or, in some cases, consumption expenditure) among individuals or households within an economy deviates from a perfectly equal distribution. A Lorenz curve plots the cumulative percentages of total income received against the cumulative number of recipients, starting with the poorest individual or household. The Gini index measures the area between the Lorenz curve and a hypothetical line of absolute equality, expressed as a percentage of the maximum area under the line. Thus a Gini index of 0 represents perfect equality, while an index of 100 implies perfect inequality.
356 Spending on social protection as % of GDP A Structure of social protection expenditure old age and survivors, sickness/health care, family/children, disability, unemployment, administration costs, housing, social exclusion, other expenditure as % of GDP